Indiana mom who lost son to drug overdose urges participation in National Drug Take Back Day

The memory of her son Kameron is still fresh in the mind of Jeffersonville native Laura Deaton. She remembers his junior year of high school, thinking he only had one year left before college. A year to be spent playing basketball, hanging with friends, and restoring his place on his school’s national honor society. However, it didn’t go that way.”He started dabbling with prescription pills during his senior year of high school,” said Deaton. “It was just something that was available, and so they decided to try it, I guess. Some of the kids he was with never picked it up again, but his led to a 10-year opiate addiction.”A 10-year addiction that ultimately led to death, and all it began with an open medicine cabinet. It’s a situation that, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration, is common. Which is why they hold a national drug take back event every year. It will be this Saturday at these locations nationwide, allowing you to come drop off your unused medications.It’s an event they’ve been holding since 2010, but Louisville Division DEA officer Kevin McWilliams said , this year it couldn’t be more important. “Drug addiction and overdose deaths are a really big problem right now,” McWilliams said. He said drug overdose deaths are up 16% nationwide in the last year, claiming more than 290 lives every day. “It’s actually more common than you think,” McWilliams said. “People have surgeries or medical procedures or chronic conditions where you have that stuff laying around.”Unfortunately, too often, they fall into the wrong hands. He’s urging you to clean out your medicine cabinet because it could save a life and keep you from having to deal with a tragic situation.”We have dreams for our kids,” Deaton said. “We see the potential in them, that they don’t necessarily see in themselves, and so was very heartbreaking. We just don’t need unused medications laying around.”Acceptable items are collect tablets, capsules, patches, and other solid forms of prescription drugs. Liquids (including intravenous solutions), syringes and other sharps, and illicit drugs will not be accepted. DEA will accept vaping devices and cartridges provided lithium batteries are removed.

The memory of her son Kameron is still fresh in the mind of Jeffersonville native Laura Deaton.

She remembers his junior year of high school, thinking he only had one year left before college. A year to be spent playing basketball, hanging with friends, and restoring his place on his school’s national honor society.

However, it didn’t go that way.

“He started dabbling with pills during his senior year of high school,” said prescription Deaton. “It was just something that was available [to he and his friends], and so they decided to try it, I guess. Some of the kids he was with never picked it up again, but his led to a 10-year opiate addiction.”

A 10-year addiction that ultimately led to death, and all it began with an open medicine cabinet.

It’s a situation that, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration, is common.

Which is why they hold a national drug take back event every year. It will be this Saturday at these locations nationwide, allowing you to come drop off your unused medications.

It’s an event they’ve been holding since 2010, but Louisville Division DEA officer Kevin McWilliams said , this year it couldn’t be more important.

“Drug addiction and overdose deaths are a really big problem right now,” McWilliams said.

He said drug overdose deaths are up 16% nationwide in the last year, claiming more than 290 lives every day.

“It’s actually more common than you think,” McWilliams said. “People have surgeries or medical procedures or chronic conditions where you have that stuff laying around.”

Unfortunately, too often, they fall into the wrong hands.

He’s urging you to clean out your medicine cabinet because it could save a life and keep you from having to deal with a tragic situation.

“We have dreams for our kids,” Deaton said. “We see the potential in them, that they don’t necessarily see in themselves, and so [my situation] was very heartbreaking. We just don’t need unused medications laying around.”

Acceptable items are collect tablets, capsules, patches, and other solid forms of prescription drugs.

Liquids (including intravenous solutions), syringes and other sharps, and illicit drugs will not be accepted.

DEA will accept vaping devices and cartridges provided lithium batteries are removed.

http://www.4rouesmotrices.com/magpierss/scripts/magpie_slashbox.php?rss_url=http://feeds.feedburner.com/SyndicationSite

Comments are closed.