TikTok trend raises teenage and mental health concerns

A new trend on TikTok could lead some teenagers to believe they have a serious mental disorder, according to some experts. The social media platform enables users to connect in video posts. bipolar or dissociative identity disorder. Some of these videos list possible signs to look out for and encourage viewers to rate themselves. Samantha Fridley, 18, who had a history of depression, told Good Morning America that the videos influenced her to believe she had mental illness. “My thoughts were like, ‘Maybe I don’t have depression and anxiety. Maybe I have something else, ‘”said Fridley. Videos with hashtags like borderline personality disorder get hundreds of millions of views, even though this particular condition is extremely rare and affects only 1.4% of the US adult population, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, “said Dr. Robert Brooks of Harvard Medical School. Brooks said he and other psychologists rarely diagnose bipolar disorder in teenagers because their brains are still developing, leading to ups and downs that are often perfectly normal, says child psychologist Dr. John Sargent that parents should use any form of self-diagnosis as a means of talking to their child. “You should not lightly dismiss concerns. You should understand the concerns and have a conversation with your child. “In a statement to ABC News, a TikTok spokesperson said,” We care deeply about the well-being of our community, so we continue to invest in building digital skills that people can use intended to help evaluate and understand content they are studying. We strongly encourage individuals to seek professional medical advice if they need assistance. ”

A new trend on TikTok could lead some teenagers to believe they have a serious mental disorder, according to some experts.

The social media platform enables users to connect in video posts. Recently, some trending videos have been shown of young people claiming to have a borderline personality, bipolar, or dissociative identity disorder. Some of these videos list possible signs to look out for and encourage viewers to rate themselves.

Samantha Fridley, 18, who had a history of depression, told Good Morning America that the videos led her to believe that she had a mental disorder.

“My opinion was, ‘Maybe I don’t have depression and anxiety. Maybe I have something else,'” Fridley said.

Videos with hashtags like borderline personality disorder get hundreds of millions of views, despite the fact that this particular condition is extremely rare, affecting only 1.4% of the US adult population, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

“Self-diagnosis shouldn’t be done,” said Dr. Robert Brooks from Harvard Medical School.

Brooks said he and other psychologists rarely diagnose bipolar disorder in teenagers because their brains are still developing, resulting in ups and downs that are often perfectly normal.

The child psychologist Dr. Tufts’ John Sargent says parents should use any type of self-diagnosis as an opportunity to talk to their child.

“You shouldn’t be lightly dismissing the concern. You should understand the concern and have a conversation with your child.” said Sargent.

In a statement to ABC News, a TikTok spokesperson said, “The wellbeing of our community is very important to us, which is why we continue to invest in digital literacy education to help people evaluate and understand content they interact with online strongly encourage individuals to seek professional medical advice if they need assistance. “

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